samedi 8 septembre 2012

OH YES WE CARE





Voici les temps forts du discours puisant et très "rooseveltien" du candidat Obama à sa propre réélection.
Il peut se résumer en une formule: "oh yes we care."
Nous y reviendrons. Retenons que pour relever les immenses défis de demain, l'accent le plus fort a été mis sur la nécessité d'investir dans l'enseignement et l'éducation. En attendant, voici le résumé du NYT.

Manufacturing
Mr. Obama, in his acceptance speech, said, “We can help big factories and small businesses double their exports, and if we choose this path, we can create a million new manufacturing jobs in the next four years.”
Looking at current trends, it is certainly possible: the nation has added about 222,000 manufacturing jobs in the past year. Moreover, the Obama campaign has several proposals to encourage manufacturers to add workers.
But there is a bigger economic story behind the gains in manufacturing. For three decades, manufacturers had cut jobs, and then when therecession hit, they slashed hundreds of thousands more. Now, some economists say, they might be adding workers to simply regain some lost capacity.
American workers’ wages have also been stagnant for more than a decade, and in many cases have declined during the recession. Over the same period, pay climbed in many other countries, making American workers’ wages more competitive. Strong blue-collar wage growth here or lower wages in foreign countries would send more jobs back overseas, economists say.
Mr. Obama also repeated his promise to double exports, to about $3.2 trillion a year in 2014 from about $1.6 trillion in 2009. He is roughly on track to meet that goal, with exports running at an annual
pace of $2.2 trillion, judging by data from the first half of the year.
But Mr. Obama got help by starting the clock during the depths of the recession in 2009, when global trade dipped and American exports fell.
And the strength of the dollar against other currencies — a factoralmost entirely outside of American politicians’ control — will mainly determine export growth in the short term, economists argue.

Energy
Mr. Obama, seeking to capitalize on energy trends for which his administration is only partly responsible, announced that he was setting a goal of cutting “our oil imports in half by 2020, and support more than 600,000 new jobs in natural gas alone.”
He intends to achieve that goal by increasing domestic oil and gas production, mandating increases in autos’ and trucks’ fuel economy, substituting ethanol and other alternative fuels for gasoline, streamlining regulation and converting trucks and buses to run on natural gas.
But the campaign said that the administration would continue to lease public lands and offshore areas for drilling, including in the Arctic Ocean off Alaska. Industry groups contend that the administration has held back oil development on public lands and that most of the increased production is coming from private property.
A campaign document says that the president is using 2008 as a baseline for the reduction in imports, allowing him to claim credit for several years of declining demand for fuel because of the recession and leasing and production decisions made by President George W. Bush’s administration.
The president’s projections are in line with those of government and independent analysts, who say that if current trends continue, imports will decline to levels not seen for decades, even without additional policy changes.
Medicare
Mr. Biden criticized the Romney campaign on Medicare, saying, “What they didn’t tell you is what they’re proposing would cause Medicare to go bankrupt by 2016.” But the actions he described would not end Medicare in four years.
At issue is the Medicare trust fund, which is fed by payroll taxes, and what would happen to it if President Obama’s health care law were to be repealed, as the Republicans have vowed to do.
The solvency of the trust fund has long been in question. Mr. Obama’s health care law extended its solvency by curbing the growth of projected spending — the $716 billion Medicare cut that has been debated in the campaign — and by raising some revenues. As the 2011 annual report of the Medicare trustees put it, the financial status of the “trust fund is substantially improved by the lower expenditures and additional tax revenues instituted by the Affordable Care Act.”
Absent those savings, the trust fund will be exhausted sooner.
What would happen then? The most recent report states: “If assets were exhausted, Medicare could pay health plans and providers only to the extent allowed by ongoing tax revenues — and these revenues would be inadequate to fully cover costs. Beneficiary access to health care services would rapidly be curtailed.” But it adds that, in practice, Congress has never allowed the trust fund to become depleted.
Afghanistan
“In 2014, our longest war will be over.” That is what President Obama said tonight about Afghanistan.
Well, maybe. That is the deadline for pulling out all American and other foreign troops. But the White House has said that it envisions an “enduring force” in Afghanistan for years to come that could amount to 10,000 to 15,000 troops. They would not be in combat, but they would be there to stop the Taliban from overtaking Kabul, the capital, and to keep Pakistan from losing control of its 100 or so nuclear weapons. The United States’ combat role may soon be over; it is less
likely the war will be. (NYT)


EDUCATION WAS THE GATEWAY TO OPPORTUNITY FOR ME. IT WAS THE GATEWAY FOR MICHELLE. AND NOW MORE THAN EVER, IT IS THE GATEWAY TO A MIDDLE-CLASS LIFE.
(...)
It will be a choice between two different paths for America.
A choice between two fundamentally different visions for the future.
Ours is a fight to restore the values that built the largest middle class and the strongest economy the world has ever known;
(...)
My grandparents were given the chance to go to college, buy their first home, and fulfill the basic bargain at the heart of America’s story: the promise that hard work will pay off; that responsibility
will be rewarded; that everyone gets a fair shot, and everyone does their fair share, and everyone plays by the same rules – from Main Street to Wall Street to Washington, DC.
I ran for President because I saw that basic bargain slipping away.
(...)
After all that we’ve been through, I don’t believe that rolling back regulations on Wall Street will help the small businesswoman expand, or the laid-off construction worker keep his home. We’ve been there, we’ve tried that, and we’re not going back. We’re moving forward.
(...)
The truth is, it will take more than a few years for us to solve challenges that have built up over decades. It will require common effort, shared responsibility, and the kind of bold, persistent experimentation that Franklin Roosevelt pursued during the only crisis worse than this one.
Our problems can be solved. Our challenges can be met. The path we offer may be harder, but it leads to a better place. And I’m asking you to choose that future. I’m asking you to rally around a set of goals for your country – goals in manufacturing, energy, education, national security, and the deficit; a real, achievable plan that will lead to new jobs, more opportunity, and rebuild this economy on a stronger foundation.
(...)
We can choose a future where we export more products and outsource fewer jobs. After a decade that was defined by what we bought and borrowed, we’re getting back to basics, and doing what America has always done best:
We’re making things again.
And yes, my plan will continue to reduce the carbon pollution that is heating our planet – because climate change is not a hoax. More
droughts and floods and wildfires are not a joke. They’re a threat to our children’s future. And in this election, you can do something about it.
You can choose a future where more Americans have the chance to gain the skills they need to compete, no matter how old they are or how much money they have. 
EDUCATION WAS THE GATEWAY TO OPPORTUNITY FOR ME. IT WAS THE GATEWAY FOR MICHELLE. AND NOW MORE THAN EVER, IT IS THE GATEWAY TO A MIDDLE-CLASS LIFE.
For the first time in a generation, nearly every state has answered our call to RAISE THEIR STANDARDS FOR TEACHING AND LEARNING. Some of the worst schools in the country have made real gains in math and reading. Millions of students are paying less for college today because we finally took on a system that wasted billions of taxpayer dollars on banks and lenders.
And now you have a choice – we can gut education, or we can decide that in the United States of America, no child should have her dreams deferred because of a crowded classroom or a crumbling school. No family should have to set aside a college acceptance letter because they don’t have the money. No company should have to look for workers in China because they couldn’t find any with the right skills here at home.
Government has a role in this. But TEACHERS MUST INSPIRE; PRINCIPALS MUST LEAD; PARENTS MUST INSTILL A THIRST FOR LEARNING, AND STUDENTS, YOU’VE GOT TO DO THE WORK. And together, I promise you – WE CAN OUT-EDUCATE AND OUT-COMPETE ANY COUNTRY ON EARTH. HELP ME RECRUIT 100,000 MATH AND SCIENCE TEACHERS IN THE NEXT TEN YEARS, AND IMPROVE EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION. HELP GIVE TWO MILLION WORKERS THE CHANCE TO LEARN SKILLS AT THEIR COMMUNITY COLLEGE THAT WILL LEAD DIRECTLY TO A JOB. HELP US WORK WITH COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES TO CUT IN HALF THE GROWTH OF TUITION COSTS OVER THE NEXT TEN YEARS. WE CAN MEET THAT GOAL TOGETHER. YOU CAN CHOOSE THAT FUTURE FOR AMERICA.

I want to reform the tax code so that it’s simple, fair, and asks the wealthiest households to pay higher taxes on incomes over $250,000 – the same rate we had when Bill Clinton was president; the same rate we had when our economy created nearly 23 million new jobs, the biggest surplus in history, and a lot of millionaires to boot.
(...)
No party has a monopoly on wisdom. No democracy works without compromise. But when Governor Romney and his allies in Congress tell us we can somehow lower our deficit by spending trillions more on new tax breaks for the wealthy – well, you do the math. I refuse to go along with that. And as long as I’m President, I never will.
I refuse to ask middle class families to give up their deductions for owning a home or raising their kids just to pay for another millionaire’s tax cut. I refuse to ask students to pay more for college; or kick children out of Head Start programs, or eliminate health insurance for millions of Americans who are poor, elderly, or disabled – all so those with the most can pay less.
And I will never turn Medicare into a voucher. No American should ever have to spend their golden years at the mercy of insurance companies.
They should retire with the care and dignity they have earned. Yes, we will reform and strengthen Medicare for the long haul, but we’ll do it by reducing the cost of health care – not by asking seniors to pay thousands of dollars more. And we will keep the promise of Social Security by taking the responsible steps to strengthen it – not by turning it over to Wall Street.
This is the choice we now face. This is what the election comes down to. Over and over, we have been told by our opponents that bigger tax cuts and fewer regulations are the only way; that since government can’t do everything, it should do almost nothing. If you can’t afford health insurance, hope that you don’t get sick. If a company releases toxic pollution into the air your children breathe, well, that’s just the price of progress. If you can’t afford to start a business or go to college, take my opponent’s advice and “borrow money from your parents.”
You know what? That’s not who we are. That’s not what this country’s about.
(...)
But we also believe in something called citizenship – a word at the very heart of our founding, at the very essence of our democracy; the idea that this country only works when we accept certain obligations to one another, and to future
We believe that when a family can no longer be tricked into signing a mortgage they can’t afford, that family is protected, but so is the value of other people’s homes, and so is the entire economy.
We believe that a little girl who’s offered an escape from poverty by a great teacher or a grant for college could become the founder of the next Google, or the scientist who cures cancer, or the President of the United States – and it’s in our power to give her that chance.
Because we understand that this democracy is ours.
(...)
We, the People, recognize that we have responsibilities as well as rights; that our destinies are bound together; that a freedom which only asks what’s in it for me, a freedom without a commitment to
others, a freedom without love or charity or duty or patriotism, is unworthy of our founding ideals, and those who died in their defense.
As citizens, we understand that America is not about what can be done for us. It’s about what can be done by us, together, through the hard and frustrating but necessary work of self-government.
So you see, the election four years ago wasn’t about me. It was about you. My fellow citizens – you were the change.
(...) 
You’re the reason a young immigrant who grew up here and went to school here and pledged allegiance to our flag will no longer be deported from the only country she’s ever called home; why selfless soldiers won’t be kicked out of the military because of who they are or who they love; why thousands of families have finally been able to say to the loved ones who served us so bravely: “Welcome home.”

Only you have the power to move us forward.
But as I stand here tonight, I have never been more hopeful about America. Not because I think I have all the answers. Not because I’m naïve about the magnitude of our challenges.
I’m hopeful because of you.
(...) 
America, I never said this journey would be easy, and I won’t promise that now. Yes, our path is harder – but it leads to a better place. Yes our road is longer – but we travel it together. We don’t
turn back. We leave no one behind. We pull each other up.



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