mardi 8 novembre 2016

LES RAISINS DE LA COLÈRE

La défaite de Hillary ne nous étonne absolument pas.
Nous l’annonçons et le redoutons depuis des mois.
La Trumpmania l’a emporté. Ce n’est pas une surprise, Michael Moore nous avait prévenus. “The people who are for Trump are not embarrassed to be for Trump.” (NYT)
L’Amérique profonde, puritaine, wasp, frustrée, nostalgique a dit non à l’Amérique cosmopolite, jeune, métissée, libérale, et libérée.
Les états de la côte est se sont ralliés à Clinton, l’Amérique profonde a embouché les « trumpettes » de Jéricho. C’est le retour annoncé de l’esprit du sénateur Joseph McCarthy.
« There turns out to be a huge number of people — white people, living mainly in rural areas — who don’t share at all our idea of what America is about” (NYT)
This election can be viewed partly as a contest between the forces of nostalgia — those who look back longingly at the white, ’50s-era suburban world and Americans who believe that the country has progressed considerably since the culturally monotone mid-20th century.(…)Seven in 10 Trump supporters prefer the more culturally homogeneous America of 1950s and that the same proportion of Clinton voters believe that American society has changed for better since then.” (NYT)
“The trouble is that this new, American version of the disinherited has squandered their voice a retro turn to racism and sexism, without anything resembling a plan, or a new vision for America.” (NYT)
Les bourses s’effondrent déjà et on n’a encore rien vu.
“I don’t know how we go forward from here. Is America a failed state and society? It looks truly possible.” Paul Krugman
Ces paroles terribles et désabusées expriment l’état d’esprit des démocrates (au sens large du terme).
Des flots d’encre vont inonder la presse écrite et un tsunami médiatique va s’abattre sur la médiasphère.
Nous avons décidé de nous boucher les oreilles, de fermer notre écran et d’essayer de réfléchir à ce qui va advenir. « We are in uncharted territory now, a place where there are no directions or guidelines.”
Un cygne noir étend ses ailes sur l’Amérique. Plus rien ne sera plus comme avant et on ne saurait exclure le pire.
MG


PAUL KRUGMAN (NYT): OUR UNKNOWN COUNTRY

What we do know is that people like me, and probably like most readers of The New York Times, truly didn’t understand the country we live in. We thought that our fellow citizens would not, in the end, vote for a candidate so manifestly unqualified for high office, so temperamentally unsound, so scary yet ludicrous.
We thought that the nation, while far from having transcended racial prejudice and misogyny, had become vastly more open and tolerant over time.
We thought that the great majority of Americans valued democratic norms and the rule of law.
It turns out that we were wrong. There turn out to be a huge number of people — white people, living mainly in rural areas — who don’t share at all our idea of what America is about. For them, it is about blood and soil, about traditional patriarchy and racial hierarchy. And there were many other people who might not share those anti-democratic values, but who nonetheless were willing to vote for anyone bearing the Republican label.
I don’t know how we go forward from here. Is America a failed state and society? It looks truly possible. I guess we have to pick ourselves up and try to find a way forward, but this has been a night of terrible revelations, and I don’t think it’s self-indulgent to feel quite a lot of despair.


BEFORE I PACK MY BAGS
By KEVIN BAKER(NYT)
We were, for the most part, just the sorts of rootless cosmopolitans that Mr. Trump’s supporters most thoroughly despise: Americans who also have citizenship in France and England, a woman whose family fled the mullahs when they came to power in Iran. A schoolteacher whose family emigrated from Mexico a generation ago. All day long we had listened to the latest polls and surveys, and told ourselves that it still could not possibly happen — that the other America we had always dreaded, and always feared was out there, could not possibly prevail in the end. (…)Now it appears clear that Trumpland was even more impenetrable to us than we thought — even to our most able opinion seekers. Instead, the Republican pundit Steve Schmidt had it right on MSNBC: “The people who are for Trump are not embarrassed to be for Trump.
(…)Certainly, they have a great deal to be angry about, and a great deal that Hillary Clinton and her husband ignored, and have ignored for almost a quarter-century now. They destroyed the old Democratic Party of liberal economics, and replaced it with nothing but a hope and a promise too far for much of the country to ever attain.
The trouble is that this new, American version of the disinherited has squandered their voice on a dyspeptic scream, a retro turn to racism and sexism, without anything resembling a plan, or a new vision for America.
(…)I knew was mostly hoping desperately that Mr. Trump’s voters could not possibly hate the rest of us so completely that they would vote in droves for the most irresponsible and openly bigoted candidate ever to gain a major-party nomination.
A friend called to say that this is what it felt like in Britain, as Brexit was going down. We are in uncharted territory now, a place where there are no directions or guidelines. A president who has close and perhaps undisclosed ties to a powerful foreign dictator and American enemy? A president with absolutely no public-sector experience? A cabinet to be filled with an array of characters more bizarre than your average Batman villains? A far-right Supreme Court for the next generation?
Our little gathering broke up in confusion, with more than one of our guests wondering if they would actually have to move. It’s something that I, as a native-born, white male — some of whose family were probably in this country circa 1620 — will have to consider, too, if my wife and I are to have any form of health care before we reach Medicare (assuming that Medicare will still be there, either). These are words I never thought I would have to write. This has indeed been a campaign full of surprises, and I fear it will take away all our words for good.


WE'RE NEAR THE BREAKING POINT Thomas L. Friedman,
BEYOND TRUMP AND CLINTON (NYT)

One vision of America past. Getty Images

This election can be viewed partly as a contest between the forces of nostalgia — those who look back longingly at the white, ’50s-era suburban world and Americans who believe that the country has progressed considerably since the culturally monotone mid-20th century.
(…)Seven in 10 Trump supporters prefer the more culturally homogeneous America of 1950s and that the same proportion of Clinton voters believe that American society has changed for better since then.
The poll showed white evangelical Protestants — a potent Trump voting block — to be the group most alienated from the American present. About three-quarters of them say the culture has mainly changed for the worse in the past six decades.
This discontent is clearly related to the country’s recent decision to legalize same-sex marriage. White evangelicals also tend to be uncomfortable with the demographic shifts that have created a browner, more multilingual country. As Robert P. Jones explained in his recent book, “The End of White Christian America,” this group is shrinking, which means that its influence on political affairs is bound to decline. The percentage of white Christians in the population has declined to 43 percent today from 54 percent in 2008. The sense that social norms are changing and beyond their control may well explain why religious leaders are attracted to Mr. Trump’s nostalgic sales pitch, despite his suspect credentials as a conservative Christian.
Meanwhile, the decline in the white Christian population in states like Georgia, North Carolina, Virginia and Pennsylvania has clear political import for the Republican Party. It means that the strategy of appealing to this particular group of voters — while ignoring other, growing segments of the population — can’t last much longer.

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